Since writing about it a few days ago, I’ve been doing some more contemplation on the idea of margin and how I spend my time. Thomas Merton urged Christians to recover a “simple and wholesome life, lived at a moderate and humanly agreeable tempo.” I think that succinctly describes a life with margin.
a
William D. Longstaff wrote a poem in the early 1880’s that has become a classic hymn. It describes a life I feel confident would result in the correct amount of margin. I’m singing it this morning as a personal challenge and prayer. Will you join me?

aa

a

a


Take time to be holy, speak oft with thy Lord;
Abide in Him always, and feed on His Word.
Make friends of God’s children, help those who are weak,
Forgetting in nothing His blessing to seek.

a

Take time to be holy, the world rushes on;
Spend much time in secret, with Jesus alone.
By looking to Jesus, like Him thou shalt be;
Thy friends in thy conduct His likeness shall see.

a

Take time to be holy, let Him be thy Guide;
And run not before Him, whatever betide.
In joy or in sorrow, still follow the Lord,
And, looking to Jesus, still trust in His Word.

a

Take time to be holy, be calm in thy soul,
Each thought and each motive beneath His control.
Thus led by His Spirit to fountains of love,
Thou soon shalt be fitted for service above.
©Brenda Pace, 2010
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow is credited with these words: “In character, in manner, in style, in all things, the supreme excellence is simplicity.”
Check out this excellent presentation of simplicity:

Happy weekend!